January
New Year’s Day
My mother always used to say, “What you do on New Year’s Day, you’ll do for the rest of the year.”

February
Son of Comma-tose
As I’ve mentioned before
, a lot of comma usage is a matter of individual style and taste.

March
What’s in a Name?
It’s a sad fact that short stories and novels have to have titles.

April
Chasing the White Whale
An outside observer, surveying the existing canon of the science fiction genre, might well be forgiven for asking, “What is it about sf writers and Moby-Dick?”

May
More from the Department of Nifty Stuff
Because writers, as I’ve observed before, are intellectual packrats who gather up odd bits of information just in case they may need one of them someday: The scholarly hairdresser who figured out how to do the Vestal Virgins’ seven-braid hairdo also takes on 18th-19th century papillote curls — the “curling-papers” we read about in period fiction.

June
The Benefits of Forethought
A line of thunderstorms rumbled through northern New England late this afternoon, knocking the power out in our town(among a whole bunch of other towns) for over four hours, right about dinnertime.

July
The Return of Mindless Cookery for Distracted Writers
Another dead-simple recipe for nights when your brain isn’t up to anything more elaborate.

August
How Long is a Piece of String?
I finished a short story this evening, just barely making the deadline.

September
Sultry Weather
Hot and humid, with thunderstorms happening in random places that aren’t here.

October
Back from the Road
I’m back in town after a long weekend in Montreal (lovely city, and in fact closer to us than Boston); in lieu of anything more substantive, have a couple of amusing links:

November
Now This is Neat
A Roman-era sculpture of an eagle with a serpent in its beak has been found at a development site in the City of London.

December
Peeve of the Day
Today’s peeve, gentlebeings and fellow wordsmiths, is that pair of weasel words, “somehow” and “something.”